Crowdfunding Promotion Scams & How To Spot Them

When I saw this article that Joe Daniels wrote about crowdfunding advertising scams back in January I thought he pretty much wrote the book on the subject.

But I was wrong.

Yesterday it came to my attention that a brand new crowdfunding promotion website is for sale

It seems that Joe Daniels only scratched the surface of the crowdfunding scam problem.

If you examine the screen shots below you’ll see that the seller of this crowdfunding promotion website is based in India, the website is visually very appealing and here’s the best part…

…the success stories, customer testimonials and the advertised crowdfunding expertise are all FAKE.

Check out the ad listing in the link above or the screen shots below. 100% of the work is outsourced – probably back to India. We’ve known for years there are scores of scam crowdfunding websites out there and that the vast majority of crowdfunding promotion services offered by these websites are total garbage but we also remember one of the golden rules of business “Never talk bad about a competitor.”

But what about the website Joe Daniels dissected as a 100% scam operation that blatantly lies to the public to pocket the money of unsuspecting crowdfunders?

Or the website I discovered – Crowdfundings.net – do I keep one hand tied behind my back and politely nod when a potential customer asks me how Crowdfund Buzz compares to them and then bite my tongue?

Hell no.

Outside of law and science most rules can and should be broken when warranted. Even the golden rules.

I wish the golden rules can stand up sturdy and strong today as they did years, decades and centuries ago but today there are so many shades of gray so as to take the shine right off any golden rule.

I might be coming off strong here but I’m not going to apologize for my passion. Everyone here at Crowdfund Buzz are crowdfunding professionals and to see so many fake, phony and fraudulent crowdfunding promotion websites even be considered in the same league as us to the point of comparison is like asking a Three Michelin Star gourmet chef if his food is as good as the nearest slop house deli on a street corner.

A picture is worth a thousand words. Here are 7,000 words on crowdfunding advertising scams:

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